Saree Draping Made Easy – Different ways of draping a Saree


The region where a woman belongs mostly influences the way a saree is worn by her. The style of draping a saree is a reflection of the state she belongs to. There are nearly 80 different ways of wearing a saree. However, before you proceed to learn the saree draping styles, it is better to know the two essential parts required complimenting a saree, they are:

– A petticoat, which is a long skirt like garment, tied around the waist with a drawstring. It should be of the same color as the saree and any part of it should remain hidden inside the sari, as this forms the base of the garment.
– A proper fitting saree blouse of a color matching the saree, ending below the bust. It can be long or short sleeved or even sleeveless.

The conventional way of wearing a saree
1. Initially you have to tuck the sari around your body starting from the navel you go left, adjusting the saree according to your height, you finish when you have made one full circle.
2. Next to measure the length of the pallu, you have to hold the top edge of the saree and wrap it around your hips and bring it to the shoulder, and let it hang up to the back of your knee.
3. Then take the portion left around your waist and start-making 7-10 neat pleats from left and tuck it down onto the waist petticoat.
4. Similarly now take the pallu and wrap it once again on your shoulder making neat pleats there as well. Pin it up properly on the left shoulder so that it stays in its place.

The look of the Indian Woman is complete when a bindi and proper jewelry is added to this saree.

Various ways of draping a saree

The saree draping styles of a saree vary according to the different regions of India. It is estimated that there are nearly 80 different styles of draping a saree. Some of the most popular ones are:

Gujarati Style Saree Draping: This style is predominantly found in Northern India, like Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh, and is called the ‘seedha pallu’, as the saree and its pleats open to the right unlike the usual way. The pallu here comes from the back over the right shoulder and then it is stretched across the chest and the left end of the pallu is folded in the petticoat at the back.

Maharashtrian Style Saree Draping: This is a 8 meters long saree unlike the normal 5.5 meters, where a portion of a saree goes between the legs and is put in the back of the waist, and the other portion becomes the pallu over the bosom. This allows movement more freely as it acts as a divided saree.

Tamilian Style Saree Draping: This saree is also similarly long like Maharashtran style of 8 metres, which is draped around the waist with the pleats inclined towards the left side. The portion left is taken over the shoulder, is once again wrapped around the waist and inserted on the let side.

Bengali Style Saree Draping: The Bengali saree is worn without pleats, as it is draped around the waist, brought back to the right side and the pallu is thrown over the left shoulder with a bunch of keys attached to its end. This pallu is then passed under the right arm and thrown over the left shoulder again. Basically, it can be said only two big pleats comprises this style. To get the apt Bengali look you can wear ballooned or puffy sleeve blouses.

Dravidian Style Saree Draping: This is nothing but pleated rosette, at the waist, which is worn by women of Tamil Nadu.

Nivi Style Saree Draping: This style of Andhra Pradesh is held in place by the folds into the petticoat, leaving the pallu hanging over the shoulder. If wearing ‘Kaccha Nivi,’ you have to pass the pleats between your legs and tuck it into the back of your waist.

Coorgi Style Saree Draping: Here you have to tie the pleats into the backside and a small portion of the pallu is placed above the shoulder.

Gond Style Saree Draping: This is just the opposite way of draping the saree where the first part is wrapped over the shoulder and then the rest is set to cover up the body.

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